Coleman Hawkins- Recordings 1938

Blues Evermore The Coleman Hawkins Trio
Blues Evermore Coleman Hawkins (ts);
Maurice Van Cleef (d); Freddy Johnson (p)
Hilversum, Netherlands, June 14, 1938
Dear Old Southland The Coleman Hawkins Trio
Dear Old Southland Coleman Hawkins (ts);
Maurice Van Cleef (d); Freddy Johnson (p)
Hilversum, Netherlands, June 14, 1938
Way Down Yonder In New Orleans The Coleman Hawkins Trio
Way Down Yonder In New Orleans Coleman Hawkins (ts);
Maurice Van Cleef (d); Freddy Johnson (p)
Hilversum, Netherlands, June 14, 1938
I Know That You Know The Coleman Hawkins Trio
I Know That You Know Coleman Hawkins (ts);
Maurice Van Cleef (d); Freddy Johnson (p)
Hilversum, Netherlands, June 14, 1938
When Buddha Smiles The Coleman Hawkins Trio
When Buddha Smiles Coleman Hawkins (ts);
Maurice Van Cleef (d); Freddy Johnson (p)
Hilversum, Netherlands, June 14, 1938
Swinging In The Groove The Coleman Hawkins Trio
Swinging In The Groove Coleman Hawkins (ts);
Maurice Van Cleef (d); Freddy Johnson (p)
Hilversum, Netherlands, June 14, 1938

Encyclopedia of World Biography on Coleman Hawkins

coleman Hawkins TrioThe American jazz musician Coleman Hawkins (1904-1969) transformed the tenor saxophone from a comic novelty into jazz's glamour instrument. He was one of the music's all-time preeminent instrumental voices.

Coleman Hawkins was born on November 21, 1904, in St. Joseph, Missouri. His mother, an organist, taught him piano when he was 5; at 7, he studied cello; and for his 9th birthday he received a tenor saxophone. By the age of 12 he was performing professionally at school dances; he attended high school in Chicago, then studied harmony and composition for two years at Washburn College in Topeka, Kansas.

His first regular job, in 1921, was with singer Mamie Smith's Jazz Hounds, and he made his first recording with them in 1922. Based in Kansas City, the band played the major midwestern and eastern cities, including New York, where in 1923 he guest recorded with the famous Fletcher Henderson Band. A year later he officially joined Henderson's band and remained with it until 1934.

The first half of his tenure with Henderson served as a valuable apprenticeship, and by 1929, inspired by Louis Armstrong's improvisational concepts, Hawkins had developed the hallmarks of his mature style--a very large tone, a heavy vibrato, and a swaggering attack. Hitherto the tenor saxophone had been regarded as a novelty instrument serving chiefly for rhythmic emphasis (achieved by a slap-tonguing technique) or for bottoming out a chord in the ensemble, but not as a serious instrument and certainly not as a serious solo instrument. Hawkins' artistry singlehandedly altered its status.

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